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Hot!Reading numerals

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JBD
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2018/01/03 02:16:47 (permalink)

Reading numerals

Hi,
I am a new convert to @VoiceAloud, which I am using with my Samsung Galaxy Note 8. It's a great app.
Quick explanation - I am a criminal lawyer (please don't hold that against me), and I drive about 40 mins each way to work.  I have long (and often pretty boring) interviews to read, and am now able to listen to those through the car system whilst I drive.  The cropping feature works really well for the headers/footers.
A passage of such an interview which involves, say, 2 police officers and a defendant, might read like this:
5237: Were you there at all?
Def: No
3689: Are you sure?
Def: Certain
The numbers 5237 and 3689 are used to identify the 'collar numbers' of each police officer.
When converted to voice, the numbers are read as e.g. "Five thousand, two hundred and thirty seven", which over the course of 50 pages can get a bit tiresome.
Is there any way that the app can simply read the numerals as "Five two three seven"?  Ideally, I would like it to do that all the time, rather than having to convert specific numbers for each individual interview.
Any suggestions would be much appreciated!
Jim.

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    Re: Reading numerals 2018/01/03 08:19:11 (permalink)
    Probably could do this with "Edit speech" feature in @Voice app, but please tell me, are these always 4-digit numbers, or can they be longer or shorter too? What would be the minimum and maximum length?
    The trick would be to insert spaces between the digits, then the TTS engine would read them the way you want.
     
    Here is a replacement for 4 digit numbers - enter it by pressing menu - Settings - Edit speech, then press [+] button on top and enter the following:
     
    Replacement Type: Regular Expression (RegEx)
    Pattern: (\d)(\d)(\d)(\d)
    Replace: $1 $2 $3 $4
     
    Note that there are spaces in the "Replace" line between each $1, $2 etc. You could replicate this pattern (add another one with + button) for 3 digit numbers by entering only three (\d) groups and ending at $3 in "Replace", for 5 digit numbers by adding the fifth (\d) and $5 at the end etc.
     
    Also, if you wanted, you could modify the "Replace" part to be "$1$2 $3$4" (only one space in the middle), then it would say 5731 as "fifty seven thirty one", which is not bad, maybe even faster to say than 4 separate digits.
     
    Greg
    JBD
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    Re: Reading numerals 2018/01/03 10:22:48 (permalink)
    Hi Greg,
     
    Thanks for getting back to me so quickly.  I opted for the second suggestion, so that I now get "fifty-seven thirty-one", which is perfect.
     
    The collar numbers are a maximum of 4 digits in my local forces.  You can sometimes get single or double digits (but they are not a problem anyway).  3 digits are more common, so I might opt to add a RegEx to cover those.
     
    Many thanks, once again.
     
    Jim.
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    Re: Reading numerals 2018/01/03 12:24:42 (permalink)
    Great, happy to hear that it works now and that my little app is useful. Happy New Year!
     
    Greg
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